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"The History Of Texas Longhorn Cattle."

Lecture by Larry Ferguson

This story starts in Europe and progressively ends with the cattle drives in the 1880s. This lecture will show the quality of the cattle and how they created a culture in our society that is still growing.

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Sexton on "Orphan Trains; 1854-1929

Lecture by Clark.

" When Rev. Charles Loring Brace moved from New England to New York City to continue his seminary studies, he was appalled at the sight of so many homeless children on the streets. Some were selling newspapers, or selling matches, or just begging for food. He became so burdened for them he organized the Children's Aid Society, an orphanage in Midtown Manhattan. It soon proved to be too small to handle the amount of "street urchins" as they were called. He pleaded with a few businessmen to help him get the children out of the city, as it looked as though there was no hope for any kind of future for them. It was a great undertaking to plan and organize trains to send the children of all ages out west to hopefully find homes. Over 150,000 children were successful in being adopted as the Orphan Trains ran from 1854 to 1929. Some boys were adopted to work as farmhands and some girls to be used as young maids. These were not given the love they needed and deserved. Many others did find good homes and were given love, self-esteem, and a good education.

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The Restoration of the Rucker-Campbell House

Lecture by Ellen Gordon and Lynette Goodson

The Rucker-Campbell House was constructed in 1872 by Asa Rucker who was the owner of a large saw mill. The Rucker family was the original builders and owners of the house. The house was originally built in a Beaux Arts style and was converted to a Queen Anne Victorian in 1903. After this conversion three additions were done to the house over the years to add a sleeping porch, a solarium, and to convert the house into an apartment. In 2010, Preservation Longview began a restoration process. This process includes restoring the interior of the house, stabilization of the foundation, and reconstruction of the masonry fireplaces.

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"Texas Eastman Employees Contributions To World War II."

Lecture by Gayle English and Dr. Frank Jackson

This presentation brings to light significant connections between Texas Eastman employees during the original research and development of the RDX Explosive, and the Atomic Bomb. These men moved to our community to begin the Texas Eastman division of Eastman Chemical. The eleven employees in the presentation are now deceased, but their story and the importance of the contributions to WWII will live on.

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"East Texas And The Civil Rights In Black And Brown Oral History Project."

Lecture by Dr. Meredith May

As the oral histories conducted in Deep East Texas demonstrate, African Americans fought for their rights in places like Lufkin and Nacogdoches through demonstrations, protests, and political activism and through more subtle means, particularly persistently pursuing educational opportunities, voter registration, and quiet economic boycotts. The Civil Rights in Black and Brown Oral History project aims to recover the role of local people in the fight for justice and equity and to investigate what communities choose to remember and to forget.

Oil for Victory; The Big Inch Pipeline.

Lecture by Rickey Carter and Steve Coats

This lecture tells the story of how the Big Inch Pipeline came about an how it was one the main contributing factors to the allies winning World War II.

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